Explore Our Impact

In the last 10 years we have: 

Made revolutionary discoveries, based on the convergence of chemistry, physics, engineering and life sciences, for detection and treatment of cancer, infertility, common and rare neurodegenerative diseases, and imaging and manipulation of cell behavior.

Invested in new translational capabilities that are advancing 6 potential new drugs to clinical testing and 6 through preclinical development.

Incubated 23 new companies that have received more than $1.5B in external investment and are bringing CLP innovations to society.

Acquired more than 50 new instruments and created new services to accelerate transdisciplinary research.

Developed new 21st century curricula and activities to support development of next gen scientists working across disciplinary boundaries to address the big questions in biomedical research.

Raised more than $50M in new external funding to support these efforts.

Imagine what is possible in the next 10 years with additional funding and resources. 

Visualizing the Unseen

CLP researchers developed a
revolutionary technology that enables
researchers to study critical molecules,
such as DNA, at nanoscale resolution,
in their native state.

Basic Science Discoveries Translated into Healthcare

Where cancer lurks

Where cancer lurks

Vadim Backman, CLP resident member and Walter Dill Scott Professor of Biomedical Engineering, is featured on the Fall 2018  cover of Northwestern magazine. The story explains Backman’s path-breaking work in chromatin regulation to fight resistance in cancer and...

Cheek swab may help diagnose precancers, early malignancies

Cheek swab may help diagnose precancers, early malignancies

Original article published on July 11, 2018 in Helio, HemOncToday by Rob Volansky Promising results for a simple cheek swab test to detect precancerous lesions in lung cancer may signify an era of affordable first-line diagnostic procedures, according to researchers...

Meet Luis Schachner

Luis Schachner, a CLP Predoctoral Trainee and
Howard Hughes Medical Institute Gilliam Fellow,
spearheaded the development of new technology that
measures protein and their complexes with high fidelity
for metal binding and their chemical modifications.